Woodrow (copy)

Local favorite Woodrow will headline a '70s party at the Crystal Corner Bar on the city's near east side.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WOODROW

Good news for anyone ready to shift gears, rev up and burn rubber into the new year, leaving 2017 far, far away in the rear view mirror: There are oodles of New Year’s Eve festivities happening around Madison.

Hit up any given bar or club around town, from neighborhood favorites like the Harmony to downtown destinations like Lucille, and odds are there will be music, food and dancing to be had. On top of that, restaurants from Fuegos to Red Sushi are putting together special menus for the occasion, while neighborhood institutions like the Goodman Community Center are hosting fundraising events.

For those who need a bit of inspiration while figuring out their new year's itinerary, here’s a rundown of seven events going down on Sunday night that stand apart:

Latin Fiesta at Club Voodoo

For those who are serious about getting in some ballroom-style dancing, Club Voodoo, 802 Atlas Ave., on Madison’s far east side is hosting a veritable all-night marathon of Latin dance that starts at 8 p.m. and lasts until 8 a.m. The night features salsa, bachata, merengue and cumbia, along with some hip-hop, reggaeton and electronic tunes for those looking for some looser forms of club dancing. Ticket prices are TBD.

Free session at Dragonfly Hot Yoga

Dancing’s one thing, but for those who want to truly greet 2018 as a sweaty exhausted mess, Dragonfly Yoga, 610 Junction Rd. in Fitchburg, is hosting a night of free Vinyasa yoga. The class starts at 10:45 p.m., and lasts until 12:15 a.m.

That New Year’s Eve ‘70s Show at the Crystal Corner Bar

For those who wallow in ‘70s nostalgia, or those who just like the look of bell-bottom jeans, the Crystal Corner Bar, 1302 Williamson Street, has the party for you. One of Madison’s most popular rookie musical acts, Woodrow, will hold down the fort with a collection of covers from the era, as will folk rock outfits Imaginary Watermelons and the Lower 5th. This party will set you back $10.

New Year’s Eve at the Madison Children’s Museum

Once again, the Madison Children’s Museum, 100 N. Hamilton St., is offering a healthy dose of kid-centric programming earlier in the day on New Year’s Eve. The schedule is chock full of arts and crafts events like rock painting, snowglobe making, and paper-cookie crafting. Plus, the afternoon will cap off with a rollicking dance party at 3 p.m., replete with sparkling juice, confetti and glow bracelets. The events are free with admission.

Nature Walk at the UW-Madison Arboretum

If you’re looking for quiet, an outing to the bucolic arboretum might be the ticket. Keeping up with tradition, the UW-Madison Arboretum, 12017 Seminole Highway, will host a nighttime stroll through the city’s famous arboreal preserve from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Hot chocolate will be served at the visitor’s center to boot. The walk is free.

The People’s Wu Years Eve at Wyndham Garden Fitchburg

For those who want a classic Madison-style jam band experience, the Peoples’ Brothers Band is here to deliver the goods. The local R&B fixture will host a night of music with the Big Wu, a Minnesotan act with a similar line of dance-y, groovey, roots-inspired tunes. The party takes place at the Wyndham Garden hotel, 2969 Cahill Main, in Fitchburg. Tickets for the all-night jam sesh, which lasts from 6 p.m. through 10 a.m., are $35.

Decadance at the Majestic Theatre

This is no deep cut, but the five-year-old Decadance remains one of the city’s more inventive party ideas: The night starts at 8 p.m. with ragtime numbers from the turn of the 20th Century, before slowly progressing through music of each decade thereafter. DJs Nick Nice and Mike Carlson should arrive at hits of the modern day by the time 1 a.m. rolls around. The event at the Majestic Theatre, 115 King St., is $35.

Erik Lorenzsonn is the Capital Times' tech and culture reporter. He joined the team in 2016, after having served as an online editor for Wisconsin Public Radio and having written for publications like The Progressive Magazine and The Poughkeepsie Journal.