Capitol Tree (copy) (copy)

Alex Weimann adds lights to Wisconsin's official Christmas tree at the state Capitol Nov. 30. The 40-foot balsam fir, harvested in the town of Emery, is being decorated with ornaments created by students from around the state. 

JOHN HART, STATE JOURNAL

Christmas often brings out the best in people, a time of year when we can cherish our loved ones and spread kindness and generosity to those around us. Unfortunately, too often we forget the intended meaning of the season, and instead find ourselves walking on the pins and needles of political correctness.

At what point did saying Merry Christmas become so offensive? On more than one occasion, I’ve wished my cashier a Merry Christmas, and too often their responses suggest that good tidings and joy are only welcome if packaged in a specific and “proper” manner.

Sadly, in the conjured-up spirit of seasonal neutrality, too many businesses have decided they’re willing to take your money, and in return you won’t be unintentionally offended. They prefer to let dull political correctness determine their choice of words. I have, and will continue to make a point of noticing those companies who are willing to take a stand during this Christmas season and frequent them when possible.

I sincerely doubt those celebrating Hanukkah would take offense to being wished Merry Christmas. In a similar fashion, I would certainly not be offended if wished a Happy Hanukkah. Celebrating and welcoming the traditions of others is part of what makes our country great.

So here we are, another Christmas season in which we are compelled to appease to a manufactured, politically correct society. I, for one, don’t enjoy being told by the liberal media that we should behave in an impartial fashion and be oh-so-careful as not to offend anyone. It’s rubbish. No one is offended when wished a Merry Christmas, except for liberals hoping to check their victim box for the day.

One of the more refreshing things to me about the Trump presidency is that we have a commander in chief who says what he thinks and isn’t fazed when the media tells the liberal masses they should be offended. He refuses to back down and ignores pressures to conform to what elites determine are societal norms. We have a president who doesn’t apologize for what we elected him to do and doesn’t apologize for the greatness of our country.

You can count on me to do the same. In the state Capitol, I have a reputation for being no-nonsense and telling it like it is. And if I’ve learned anything, it’s that people respect you when you’re willing to stand up and fight for those beliefs you hold dear.

Our leaders accomplish the most when they are honest about where they stand and what they believe in. Then, the best ones follow through on their promises. When people start compromising their principles and pandering for attention, that’s what gets them in trouble.

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So this month, while many will give you their Season’s Greetings or wish you Happy Holidays, I’ll say what I mean: Merry Christmas!

Leah Vukmir is a nurse, military mom and state senator from Brookfield. She is a candidate for U.S. Senate in 2018.

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