Garganega is far from a household name in the United States, but it’s well-known in Italy where it’s a popular white grape variety grown in Italy’s northeastern Veneto region. Garganega (gahr-GAH-neh-gah) is the dominant grape used to make Soave, a white wine from the appellation of the same name. While garganega isn’t an easy word to pronounce, it can be used to make wines that are very easy to drink. Below are examples of two different styles of wines made with this grape variety.

Marcato 2016 i Prandi, Soave, Italy

Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in January for $12.99

Description • The i Prandi Soave is a light and lively unoaked white wine made from 90 percent garganega and 10 percent trebbiano. It has a distinctive and inviting floral nose and is soft and fruity, with flavors of peaches and melons. Delicate and elegant, this easy-to-drink Soave has a refreshing acidity and would make for a fine aperitif wine. It would go well with appetizers and shellfish.

Tenuta Sant’Antonio 2016 Scaia Garganega/Chardonnay, Delle Venezie, Italy

Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in January for $11.99

Description • An unoaked blend of 55 percent garganega and 45 percent chardonnay, the Scaia is a bigger-bodied white than the i Prandi. While it also has a bit of a floral nose from the garganega, the large percentage of chardonnay gives this wine more character and complexity. Tasting of apple, pear and zesty citrus, the Scaia would go well with chicken and fish dishes. The bottle has an attractive glass closure, but be aware that it can be difficult to remove.

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