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Spring has officially begun, and that means the newest rosés are starting to fill retailers’ shelves. Their colors can range from a pale blush to a light red depending on the length of time the juice was in contact with the skins of dark grapes. In addition to being fresh and lively, these wines are often quite affordable. Rosés are best consumed young, so look for the 2017 vintage and be sure to serve them chilled. The following are two different styles of dry rosés.

Aimé Roquesante 2017 Côtes de Provence, France

Bought • Costco, 4200 Rusty Road, in March for $8.99

Description • This pale salmon-colored wine comes in a very distinctive classic Provence bottle known as a skittle that looks somewhat like a bowling pin or lamp base. A blend of grenache, cinsault and syrah, this summery wine is a great patio sipper. It’s dry but not bone dry with lively flavors of cherries and watermelon. It ends with a refreshing citrus finish. This delicate wine can be enjoyed on its own or with appetizers.

La Crema 2017 Pinot Noir Rosé, Monterey, Calif.

Bought • Costco, 4200 Rusty Road, in March for $12.99

Description • Made from 100 pinot noir, this lovely pink wine comes from La Crema, part of the Jackson Family portfolio. While it’s also dry but not bone dry, it’s bigger in body, deeper in color and more complex than the Aimé Roquesante. Very aromatic and well-balanced, this is an elegant rosé that tastes of fresh, juicy strawberries and has a mouthwatering acidity. It would go well with salmon and seafood dishes.

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

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