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Have you noticed that the guy who regularly decries unions and has done more than any other politician to destroy them is now running around the country claiming he's a friend of the working man?

Scott Walker insists that his draconian stand on immigration — we should even be wary of legal immigrants, he says — is purely to protect the jobs of American workers and their pay.

Who knew that our friend the governor is concerned about workers' pay?

Isn't this the same guy who succeeded in chopping at least 15 percent from the pay of public workers and school teachers? Isn't this the politician who signed right-to-work legislation, making it more difficult for workers to hold jobs that pay union scale? Aren't he and his party behind efforts, so far unsuccessful, to repeal the prevailing wage law, a move that would significantly reduce the pay of construction workers on government projects?

Yup, he's a big friend of the working people.

But this presidential gambit has Scott Walker all over the place. At home, he's against ethanol subsidies, but when in Iowa, he's for them. At home, he talked about creating a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, but on the road before right-wing audiences, he's against any path and, in fact, wonders if we're letting too many legal immigrants come onto our shores.

Last week a Cleveland, Ohio, commentator pointed out that while Walker once bashed the GM and Chrysler bailouts during the Great Recession, he now doesn't want to say anything negative about them when he's before people who benefited from them.

In other words, our governor will say anything to anyone, depending where he is at the time.

Is it any wonder that a Milwaukee blogger last week called Walker a "fraud"?

Dave Zweifel is editor emeritus of The Capital Times. dzweifel@madison.com and on Twitter @DaveZweifel

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Dave Zweifel is editor emeritus of The Capital Times. dzweifel@madison.com and on Twitter @DaveZweifel

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