Bragging about things like workouts and posting them on social media may inspire others to work out more, too. (Dreamstime)

I recently started following my new client Louise on Instagram because — in short — I admire her. She's a rockstar, go-getting businesswoman, and she told me she's been documenting her health journey. So with some encouragement from her to check it out, I took a peek: As I scrolled through Louise's workout pics and dressy weekend snaps, my admiration jumped up another notch.

I saw that over the past 12 months, this woman had adopted a healthier diet, committed to regular workouts... and it shows. It shows in her face shape, her confidence, her pride in her dedication, everything.

So for the first time in two weeks, I actually used my ClassPass credits. I opened the app and booked a barre class for that afternoon. Why? Because I was inspired. Her badassery was motivating to me. Much as I love the "Exercise? I thought you said extra fries!" memes, her honesty and progress hit me deeply and made me want to be a better and healthier version of myself.

Think for a minute: Could you be inspiring someone too, if you let yourself?

If you're doing something you're proud of, here's why you should unapologetically let the world know about it:

1. There's enough cynicism already.

Robert Orben said, "We have enough people who tell it like it is — now we could use a few who tell it like it can be." So next time you want to go on a political rant on Facebook ... could you choose something else? Don't worry, the news has all the negative stuff covered. What we focus on expands, whether that's good or bad. Could you be the light and offer something positive instead?

2. The legit way to lead is by example.

My dad smoked pot for years, so he could never tell us kids not to with any credibility (and to his credit, he never tried). Because example is the only way to lead in a genuine way. Could that healthy, empowering example be you? Could you lead by how you act, how you eat, how you invest your savings, how you speak on stage? We all need role models!

Seven months ago, my husband gave up alcohol. Many of our friends have been curious about this. One of them has gone on a sober kick, too — openly inspired by Heath. And hey, he wasn't even bragging (apart from on New Year's Day when he was the only non-hungover human in the house). He's just doing him. And there's tremendous hope and authenticity in example.

3. Bragging begets more bragging.

A fellow life coach and friend told me recently that she's comfortable sharing her business wins (sold-out programs, media features) because she's seen me do it consistently. She said she felt too bashful before, but that seeing me do it gave her a sense of permission to do the same. And now, it's even attracted more clients and business opportunities to her. I'm pretty certain a cynical rant wouldn't generate the same results, no matter how clever or true.

When we love ourselves enough to celebrate who we are, what we do well, and what's right in our lives, we automatically allow other people to do, to be, and to have the same thing. Bragging — within reason — allows us to show what's possible, what's doable, and what reality can be for us.

And so the next Saturday morning that it's raining and I want to want to order pizza and park my derriere down on the couch... I'll check out what Louise has been up to, and probably hit the studio first.


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