The Cambridge High School boys golf coach resigned Thursday after he directed racially offensive tweets at a black NASCAR driver.

Brent Nottestad coached the golf team for four seasons but didn’t hold any other positions in the school district, said Bernie Nikolay, the district superintendent.

“The Cambridge School District was made aware of several offensive comments made on social media,” Nikolay said in a statement Thursday. “After a meeting between Mr. Nottestad and school district officials this morning, Mr. Nottestad resigned his position with the district, effective immediately.”

In a written statement, Nottestad apologized for the series of Wednesday tweets, the Cambridge News & The Deerfield Independent reported.

“I obviously regret everything that was said. I truly don’t feel like I’m a racist man, but unfortunately, that is the way I will be viewed for some time. I have let down CHS, the whole community, my players, my friends and, most importantly, my family,” Nottestad said, according to the paper. “I sincerely apologize to all the people that I have affected including driver Bubba Wallace. All I can do is ask for forgiveness ... I am currently in the process of sending Mr. Wallace an apology.”

According to the Cambridge News & Deerfield Independent, the tweets, which no longer appear on Nottestad’s profile, started after Darrell Wallace Jr., an African-American NASCAR driver, tweeted: “There is only 1 driver from an African American background at the top level of our sport..I am the 1. You’re not gonna stop hearing about ‘the black driver’ for years. Embrace it, accept it and enjoy the journey.”

Among Nottestad’s tweets at Wallace were, “Hey @BubbaWallace. Please quit with, ‘I’m black’ bs. You’re terrible. There are 1423 more credible drivers to get that ride than you.” And, “Almost looks like going to the zoo,” referencing a photo of Wallace and a white NASCAR fan.

In a remembrance Wallace posted about his dead grandmother, Nottestad tweeted back, “Granny Jan die in a police shooting?”

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Chris Aadland is a reporting intern for the Wisconsin State Journal.