Teen who hit deputy with stolen car sentenced to 11 years after stealing another car

2010-09-27T18:30:00Z 2011-02-24T16:34:56Z Teen who hit deputy with stolen car sentenced to 11 years after stealing another carBy ED TRELEVEN | etreleven@madison.com | 608-252-6134 madison.com

With a very slight limp, Dane County Sheriff’s Deputy Dale Veto walked to the witness stand Monday and told the often-painful story about his road back to full-time duty after he was struck by a stolen car while on duty.

Life has gone the other direction for Dominique Gulley, 18, who was 15 when he struck Veto on March 28, 2008, after Veto laid down spike strips on Highway 151 near Sun Prairie to stop the speeding Gulley, who was fleeing police.

A month after Veto was struck, Gulley received two years in juvenile corrections and 12 years of adult probation. But in May, four days after he was released from a juvenile institution, Gulley stole another car.

On Monday, Gulley was re-sentenced to 11 years in prison followed by 13 years of extended supervision.

“Mr. Gulley does not seem to have any regard for anyone’s lives by driving as he does, even when he’s been told not to,” Dane County Circuit Judge Stephen Ehlke said.

Gulley’s attorney, Assistant Public Defender Renee Savannah, asked that he be sentenced to three years in prison followed by 10 years of extended supervision, but Ehlke said that would be too close to what Gulley received last time.

“It worked, if you want to call it that, for four days,” Ehlke said.

At the time of the crash, Veto told Ehlke, he remembers hearing a thump as Gulley hit him at about 65 mph, then feeling the intense pain of his badly broken and twisted legs, along with a broken and separated shoulder.

With titanium in both legs and nerve damage, Veto still deals with pain. But he fought back tears most when he talked about how his injuries affected his family, including his then-7-year-old daughter, who was afraid to hug him in the hospital.

At the time Gulley was originally sentenced, the agreement reached with prosecutors was billed as one that respected Veto’s wishes for justice instead of retribution.

On Monday, Veto said he had no idea why anyone thought he approved of the agreement, which he said he thought was a “bad dream” when told about it.

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