As more candidates make their official entrances into the 2016 presidential field, an announcement from Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is likely still months away. 

“The governor has said no announcement would come until the state budget is finished,” AshLee Strong, spokeswoman for Walker's political fundraising committee, Our American Revival, told the Capital Times last month.

While we wait for that declaration, we're seeing announcements take all shapes and forms, from YouTube videos to speeches held in symbolic locations. Where will Walker announce? Here are a few guesses:

10. Twitter

What if every benign tweet about hot ham and rolls and standard government meetings has been a long, slow buildup to the biggest bombshell tweet of them all? 

9. Washington, D.C.

The governor has made no secret of his distaste for Beltway politics, but if he's going to run for president, he'll have to open himself to the possibility of living in the nation's capital. Plus, he's been in the area at least 20 times since 2012.

8. Madison, Wisconsin

He is the governor of Wisconsin, and it is Wisconsin's capital. But this one is an unlikely choice. Walker has described the political views of Dane County residents as "left of Pravda" — the Communist Russian newspaper. And in 2011, in the midst of the protests sparked by his Act 10 legislation that curbed collective bargaining rights for must public employees, Walker put it this way: "You've got a world driven by Madison, and a world driven by everybody else out across the majority of the rest of the state of Wisconsin."

7. Coral Gables, Florida

We already know Walker likes to troll the competition. Our American Revival bought ads on Twitter to promote the group in searches for other candidates on the days of their announcements. Why not announce right in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's backyard, in Coral Gables? 

6. New York

While the Big Apple is another frequent destination for Walker — two stops already this year and a handful of others over the last few years — it's also not a place he says much about one way or another. Pro: Lots of national media attention. Con: No noteworthy connections, personal or political.

5. Philadelphia

If you haven't heard the governor talk about his trip to Philadelphia, you haven't been listening to his stump speech. In public appearances throughout the country, Walker has told supporters about visiting Independence Hall as an adult after not having the opportunity to go as a child. It was a long overdue chance to connect with the history of the founding fathers, whom he elevated to "superhero" status when he was young. 

After sneaking away from a governor's conference in 2011 to see Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, Walker likes to tell crowds, it dawned on him that the founders fathers were "ordinary people who did something quite extraordinary."

The narrative for a Philadelphia announcement writes itself.

4. Plainfield, Iowa

An announcement in Iowa would surprise no one. Walker has emerged as an early GOP favorite in the state that holds the first nominating contest in the presidential election cycle. And while fundraisers and forums have taken the governor to cities like Des Moines and Dubuque, there's no place more symbolically significant for a Walker announcement than Plainfield, where he lived for seven years as a child. His father preached and his mother ran the Sunday School at First Baptist Church in the small northeast Iowa town. 

Plainfield residents still remember Walker starting a "Jesus USA Club" to encourage good deeds and raise money for a new flag for the city hall, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported in a profile of Walker's early years. From the "Jesus USA Club" to President of the USA? There's another narrative that writes itself.

3. Delavan, Wisconsin

While Walker has the Iowa ties to make an announcement there, he spent the bulk of his youth in Delavan, a community of less than 10,000 people in southern Wisconsin. From third grade through his high school graduation, he was active in his father's church, in extracurricular activities and in scouting. He participated in the model government event Badger Boys State and worked his way toward earning the rank of Eagle Scout. 

And providing more future stump speech fodder, he washed dishes at a local restaurant and flipped burgers at McDonald's. That's where he learned the value of hard work instilled in him by his parents, he has said.

2. Wauwatosa, Wisconsin

The governor's executive residence is in Maple Bluff, Wisconsin, but "home" is a two-story colonial-style home a little more than 70 miles away in Wauwatosa. The Walkers purchased the home in 2007 and lived in a smaller 'Tosa residence before that. 

Wauwatosa offers one of the sharpest illustrations of Wisconsin's political polarization, seated right on the edge of the red-blue divide between Milwaukee and its neighboring suburbs.

1. On a Harley

Why limit the announcement to one location? An avid Harley-Davidson rider, perhaps Walker will hop on his hog and take his show on the road. 

He led a group of politicians on a motorcycle tour of Milwaukee in 2013, when the National Governors Association came to town, and said "if we get in" the race, he looks forward to riding across New Hampshire.

He and his family appear on the back of the state Department of Transportation's driving maps decked out in Harley-Davidson gear in the company's museum.

And in February 2014, he wished his wife Tonette a "Happy Valentine's Day" by tweeting a photo of the two of them laughing together on the back of the 2003 Road King she gave him for his 40th birthday.

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Jessie Opoien covers state government and politics for the Capital Times. She joined the Cap Times in 2013 and has also covered Madison life, race relations, culture and music. She has also covered education and politics for the Oshkosh Northwestern.