Take a look at the stories from around our area and world that are making news today.

Ron Johnson peppered with questions about health insurance: Daniel Bice of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel writes: "It was billed as an open meeting in Franklin with U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson and the Wisconsin Grandsons of Liberty, a tea party group that has long supported the GOP senator. But what Johnson got, instead, was a series of passionate and often pointed questions from outspoken critics of the health care bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and backed by President Donald Trump. The hourlong meeting at the Root River Center was dominated by individuals such as Gail Campbell, a 69-year-old cancer patient from St. Francis. Campbell told Johnson that her doctor informed her that her cancer treatment would be restricted and that she could lose coverage for her asthma medicine and physical therapy under the American Health Care Act passed by the House. 'I don't know why your doctor would tell you that you're going to lose that,' Johnson responded. 'I don't know what basis he's got. It's way to soon to say that.' Campbell said her doctor was relying on news coverage from the New York Times. 'Oh, OK, that explains it all then,' Johnson said sarcastically, prompting widespread booing. Tim Dake, president of the Wisconsin Grandsons of Liberty, said 102 people registered for the event and he estimated 60 showed up Sunday. Dake said more than half the crowd appeared to be opponents of Johnson, something he welcomed. 'It's dull if he's just preaching to the choir,' Dake said." Read more.


Trump’s wavering promises and scandals complicate Israel trip: Nick Robins-Early of the Huffington Post writes: "President Donald Trump arrives in Israel Monday in the midst of political turmoil, following news that he revealed classified information to Russian officials. The Israeli leg of the president’s trip abroad, his first since taking office, has also seen tension over shifting plans and diplomatic stumbles. Even Trump’s arrival at the airport became a contentious event, as Israeli media reported Sunday that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu angrily commanded his ministers to attend Trump’s welcome ceremony after learning many had planned to skip it. The controversies around Trump’s visit underscore a larger shift in how some Israel officials are viewing the new U.S. president. Since the inauguration, analysts say Trump’s changing policies and vague statements have made him a more unreliable ally than many on the Israeli far right anticipated. 'There is a sense of disappointment with Trump, because their knee-jerk reaction to his election was ‘great, we don’t have to worry about a Palestinian state, we don’t have to worry about pressure on settlements and we’re going to have the American embassy in Jerusalem,’' Yossi Alpher, a former senior Israeli intelligence official, told HuffPost. 'It’s clear to them that this is not the case, and they are confused and disappointed.'” Read more.


Trump to propose big cuts to safety-net in new budget, slashing Medicaid and opening door to other limits: Damian Paletta of the Washington Post writes: "President Trump’s first major budget proposal on Tuesday will include massive cuts to Medicaid and call for changes to anti-poverty programs that would give states new power to limit a range of benefits, people familiar with the planning said, despite growing unease in Congress about cutting the safety net. For Medicaid, the state-federal program that provides health care to low-income Americans, Trump’s budget plan would follow through on a bill passed by House Republicans to cut more than $800 billion over 10 years. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that this could cut off Medicaid benefits for about 10 million people over the next decade. The White House also will call for giving states more flexibility to impose work requirements for people in different kinds of anti-poverty programs, people familiar with the budget plan said, potentially leading to a flood of changes in states led by conservative governors. Many anti-poverty programs have elements that are run by both the states and federal government, and a federal order allowing states to stiffen work requirements 'for able-bodied Americans' could have a broad impact in terms of limiting who can access anti-poverty payments — and for how long." Read more.


Tillerson waits on Turkey embassy brawl; McCain says 'look at the clip': Fox News reports: "Republicans expressed more dismay Sunday about a recent clash outside a Turkish embassy between non-violent protestors and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's security team but disagreed about what the next step should be. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told 'Fox News Sunday' that the incident Tuesday outside the Turkish ambassador's residence in Washington was 'outrageous' and that the Trump administration has expressed 'dismay' and summoned the Turkish ambassador to State Department headquarters. However, Tillerson said the administration will wait for the outcome of a department investigation, which will likely focus on cellphone videos of the bloody clash, before taking further action. 'You don't need any further information, just look at the clip,' Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said later on the Fox show. In the immediate aftermath of the incident, McCain said the U.S. should 'throw their ambassador the hell out' of the country. 'Those were his people and Erdogan's people who were sent out there' to confront the protestors, McCain said Sunday. 'That's not America.' Protestors said they suffered concussions and lost teeth in the melee, which occurred just hours after Erdogan visited President Trump at the White House." Read more.


Notre Dame students walk out on Mike Pence during commencement speechMichael Edison Hayden of ABC News writes: "A group of graduating seniors from the University of Notre Dame turned their backs on their own graduation ceremony in protest of Vice President Mike Pence, who gave their commencement address there on Sunday. The protests, which were organized by a student activist group at Notre Dame called We Stand For, were staged in response to 'marginalized people affected by Pence's politics,' according to a Facebook post published by the group last week, which urged students to join them in the walk out. 'We invite all students, faculty, and families who will be attending the Commencement ceremony to walk out with us as we take back our graduation and show our dissatisfaction with the University's selection of Mike Pence as honored speaker,' the group wrote. 'We also will walk out in dignity and solidarity with all marginalized people affected by Pence's politics, both on this campus and throughout our nation.' Video of the protest shows students leaving the facility without any signs of disruption. Many of them were wearing rainbow colored accessories in solidarity with LGBTQ politics. The speech marked a homecoming of sorts for Pence, who served as the governor of Indiana while many of the students who graduated today were attending school there. Aside from those who walked out on him, Pence was greeted warmly by the students, some of whom booed the protesters." Read more.


Trump touches orb in Saudi, lights up internet: Lauren Said-Moorhouse of CNN writes: "Saudi Arabia rolled out the red carpet for US President Donald Trump on his inaugural overseas trip, but a moment involving a glowing orb had observers scratching their heads. Trump attended the opening of the Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology on Sunday alongside his host, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, reported the state-run Saudi Press Agency. As the lights dimmed, the three leaders officially 'activated' the new center by placing their hands on an illuminated globe as a four-minute introduction video displayed on large screens behind them, according to local media. At the center of the facility, massive screens monitor and display real-time online extremist activity while over 200 data analysts work on individual desktops nearby, the Saudi Gazette reported. The new counter-terrorism center, known as Etidal, tweeted from its official account that it is designed to bring 'prime technology together with Saudi expertise and international partnership to eradicate extremism.' State photographers were on hand to capture the moment, which quickly spawned memes from social media users who likened the US President to everything from comic book characters to blockbuster movie villains." Read more.

0
0
0
0
0