Enbridge Energy on Tuesday expects to restart its 467-mile oil pipeline that runs through Wisconsin.

The company spent $2 million to repair a July 27 pipeline break near Grand Marsh in Adams County. The incident spilled 1,200 barrels of oil onto farmland.

On Monday, the Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration said Enbridge met the requirements of an amended corrective action order and gave its approval for restarting the line.

Under the consent agreement, Enbridge must meet a series of safety provisions that apply to the entire Lakehead Pipeline System, which runs from Superior to a refinery in suburban Chicago.

The measures include a daytime start, notification of emergency responders along the entire length of the pipeline, aerial patrols of the pipeline right of way and foot patrols of key areas, including pumping stations and valves.

In addition, line pressure will be restricted to 80 percent of the pressure used at the time of failure. Full pressure cannot be used until the root cause of the failure is determined and adequate remedial actions are taken, PHMSA said.

"Communities across the country deserve to know that the pipelines running underneath their homes, streets and businesses are safe," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. "Going forward, I will be holding weekly meetings with my team to ensure Enbridge is complying with our safety requirements."

PHMSA also has ordered a long-term integrity verification plan under the oversight of a third-party expert.

Jennifer Smith, an Enbridge spokeswoman, said repairs were completed last week and the line will be started on Tuesday. At full capacity, the pipeline pumps 317,000 barrels of oil a day.

"The safety of people who live and work along our pipelines as well as the protection of the environment are our top priority," Smith said. "We will continue to work closely with PHMSA to ensure that the pipeline is safely restarted."

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