Hard boiled eggs

Boiling an egg shouldn't be so hard. 

CALVIN B. ALAGOT, LOS ANGELES TIMES

There are countless methods for making hard-boiled eggs, and as many opinions regarding which is the right one. The whole exercise can be frustrating, particularly for those of us who boil eggs only once or twice a year. Do I start the eggs in cold or hot water? How long do I boil them for? Should I shock them in ice water? And if so, when? And what about steaming eggs, or cooking them in the oven?

I have a method I settled on years ago, when I worked with a high-end restaurant group in Los Angeles and had to boil dozens of eggs every week. The method is simple, and forgiving.

Don’t worry about overcooking the eggs. Because the water is slowly cooling over time, you’re unlikely to find any of that dreaded grayish-green color in the yolk.

And I haven’t had to worry about exploding eggs either. (You know, when the shell cracks and egg white seeps out like molten lava.) Because the eggs start in cold water, they’re less likely to crack as they boil. The trapped air has time to slowly bubble out of the porous shell while the water heats up, whereas when eggs are added to boiling water, the air needs to escape quickly, and often cracks the shell.

Sometimes, there’s nothing worse than going to all the trouble of cooking eggs, only to have your beautiful ovals reduced to pock-marked, well, things when you try to remove the shells. (Forget deviled eggs, you’re better using those mistakes for egg salad). These eggs shouldn’t be hard to peel at all. Crack the shell all around the egg, and gently peel it away (I find it easiest to start at the wide end of the egg, where there is an air pocket). Find the shell sticking to the white? Simply peel the eggs under cool running water.

3
1
1
3
2