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For several years now, the baby Jesus has dropped by the state Capitol for a Christmas visit, only to discover not everyone is charmed.

A traditional nativity scene featuring the Christian savior, placed in the rotunda since 2011 by Wisconsin Family Action, competes for attention with a growing array of seasonal displays and symbols, some reverent, others openly mocking of religion.

The precedent for irreligious pushback dates to 1996, when the Madison-based Freedom From Religion Foundation first erected its now-annual winter solstice sign in the rotunda. The sign’s message, composed by the foundation’s matriarch, Anne Nicol Gaylor, includes this line: “Religion is but myth and superstition that hardens hearts and enslaves minds.”

The sign was a response to the presence of a Christmas tree and a Jewish menorah in the rotunda, and to a nativity pageant conducted in the state’s foremost public building.

The solstice sign logged its 18th year last December and has emboldened others. There is now a “Festivus” pole inspired by the TV show “Seinfield,” and a display exalting the “Flying Spaghetti Monster,” a secular, satirical deity.

Recently, the Freedom From Religion Foundation added a “natural nativity scene.” Charles Darwin and Emma Goldman are among the wise people.

The resulting panoply in the rotunda speaks to Madison’s diversity of beliefs and non-beliefs, vivid evidence that nothing is so sacred here it can’t be questioned and perhaps pilloried.

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Test your memory by matching photos of some of the 100 objects that define Madison.

Photos are chosen randomly — always two of each. There are easy, medium and expert levels, all of which you can play on any device, but levels below expert will appear better on phones and tablets.