Civil War veterans parade in Washington, D.C., in 1865

Union troops parade down Pennsylvania Avenue on May 23 or 24, 1865, for the "Grand Review of the Armies," a tribute to the troops who won the Civil War before they returned home.

Library of Congress

This State Journal editorial ran on May 24, 1865, as the Civil War ended:

One of the grandest pageantries ever witnessed was the triumphant march through the National Capitol yesterday of the victorious hosts of the returning veterans of the Union army.

A great torrent of disciplined citizen soldiery, amid the reverberations of jubilant cannon, and the clash and peal of martial music, and the hurrahs of multitudes, and the smiles and waving handkerchiefs of joyous women, with gay banners and glorious old flags stained and rent in battle, poured like a mighty river through the streets for long hours.

In that great host of volunteer soldiers were men who have fought from Bull Run to the last battle beyond Richmond ... .

At last these men triumphed and now receive their reward. It was a proud day for them, and a proud day for the country. Well did they deserve the welcome given them. They who have so long only met the scowling features of enemies, saw yesterday only faces illuminated with pride and joy and admiration. They whose feet have so long trod a hostile soil, often mined with death by a treacherous foe, and amid blood and carnage, yesterday walked on flowers strewn before them by the fair hands of girls.

All honor to the heroes who have saved the Republic. ...

Another class of citizens who have been absent for some time are unostentatiously coming to resume their place in society. We allude to the sneaks, and cowards, and bounty jumpers, and fraudulent substitute brokers who retreated to Canada, and hid themselves while the war was in progress.

We trust that while the brave soldiers receive due recognition for their services, the community will not fail to let this other class know that they are appreciated....

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