William Tecumseh Sherman

William Tecumseh Sherman, officer of the Federal Army during the Civil War, stands for a portrait some time between 1860 to 1875.

Library of Congress

This State Journal editorial was published on Dec. 22, 1864, one day after Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman had successfully marched his troops through Georgia, capturing the port of Savannah for the Union Army:

The utter mendacity of the rebel newspapers, and particularly of those published at Richmond, has never been more signally shown than in their accounts of (Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh) Sherman’s progress through Georgia.

They assured their readers that Sherman’s march was seriously impeded by large forces of rebel troops, that his army was becoming seriously demoralized, that struggling and desertions in large numbers had commenced, and threw out mysterious hints respecting some great disaster that was in preparation for him. ...

The march from Atlanta was proclaimed a retreat. Sherman’s army was believed to be short of ammunition and food. ...

Similar trash was copiously dealt out to the readers of the Chicago Times under the caption of “Washington correspondence.”

We are now enabled by dispatches under Gen. Sherman’s own signature to know precisely how much truth there was in all these (secessionist) vaporings. He announces that his army is “in splendid order,” that his “supplies were abundant,” that their march was “most agreeable, and not molested by guerrillas,” that “not a wagon was lost on the trip,” and that his trains are in “better condition” than when they left Atlanta.

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