Subscribe for 33¢ / day
WOMEN BUILD CARS IN 1918

Women work on the automobile assembly line in 1918 at Nash Motors (later American Motors) during World War I.

WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

This State Journal editorial ran on Feb. 18, 1918: The U.S. Senate is keen to play little, nasty peanut politics. But it is different when it comes to handling a political measure on which the nation’s sincerity and honesty as a genuine democracy depends.

We refer to the burial of the equal suffrage amendment in that body. Weeks ago, the House voted for submission of that amendment, but it has hardly been mentioned in the Senate since. But there has been plenty of senatorial howling for sacrifice and labor by the women to further the nation’s business.

The hypocrisy of the thing is emphasized by our highest legislative body going to sleep over the question of freedom or slavery. That the Senate has important war business on hand is no excuse for a body that has devoted a solid month of its time to playing miserable little party politics. If the women of this country, who are called on to work, sacrifice and suffer for democracy, should become as foolish and indifferent as the U.S. Senate, we would soon see the finish of all democracy.

1
0
0
0
0