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Wisconsin women for suffrage

Wisconsin women participate in the first national suffrage parade in 1913 in Washington, D.C., seeking the right to vote.

This State Journal editorial ran on April 22, 1916:

Suffragists will beat the Republicans to Chicago in June. When the Republican National Convention gathers in the Windy City on June 7, the Congressional Union for Women’s Suffrage will already have completed its launching of a Woman’s Party, which will work independently of all existing political organizations to secure the immediate passage of the national suffrage amendment. ...

Everyone agrees as to the political situation: The two parties are about equal. They both want to win. The suffrage states are the doubtful states, and every one of those states is wanted by both political parties.

If in these few months an organization so strong can be built up as to convince Congress that it will really be dangerous to oppose it, then self-interest will dictate a different course to Congress than the one it has pursued.

The purpose of the Woman’s Party convention is to try to get a plank in the Republican platform, according to Miss Alice Paul of the congressional union.

A Woman’s Party as a balance of power to give aid and comfort to any party which shall inscribe on its banners “Freedom for Women” was the plan outlined, with wonderful vision, by Susan B. Anthony as long ago as 1872. Today, more than 40 years after her marvelous political mind foresaw the only way to success, the time has come when it is possible to put in execution her dream of a Woman’s Party.

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